Program Costs
Strategy 1. Provide Clean and Abundant Water for All

$12 billion/year for ten years, allocated for: a) Clean Water Infrastructure ($10 billion) spent on making available materials, tools, and training needed to build and maintain needed wells, water and sewage pipes, sanitation facilities, and water purifying systems; b) Water Use Efficiency ($2 billion) for increasing water use efficiency in agriculture. Closely related to #’s 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 11.

Cost: 6% of what the world spends on illegal drugs per year; 34% of what is spent worldwide on bottled water.

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Strategy 2. Stabilize Population

$10.5 billion/year for ten years, allocated for making birth control universally available. Closely linked with #’s 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.

Cost: 0.08% of the world’s annual military expenditures.

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Strategy 3. Eliminate Illiteracy: Education for All
$10 billion/year for ten years, allocated for: a) Television

Literacy Campaign for satellite network, solar-powered television sets, satellite receivers in villages without adequate schools; appropriate educational programming, ($2 billion/year); textbooks, teaching aids, in-service teacher training and supervision ($3 billion/year); $140 million/year for training 1 million new teachers in Africa; b) Internet Access for All for global wireless Internet access via communications satellites, land-based technology where appropriate ($4 billion/year); $1 billion/year for the preparation of Internet materials for use in developing countries. Closely related to #’s 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 10, 11.

Cost: 12.5% of the cost of Gulf War 1, or 2.8% of the 2003 tax cut given to the richest U.S. citizens; 14 months of what the U.S. spends on video games.
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Strategy 4. Provide Health Care For All

$25 billion/year for ten years, allocated for: a) Providing primary health care ($12 billion) through Community Health Workers to all areas in the world that do not have access to health care; Special Child Health Care: ($2.5 billion) for: (1) immunizing 1 billion children in developing world against measles, tuberculosis, diphtheria, whooping cough, polio and tetanus, thereby preventing the death of 6–7 million children/year; (2) providing oral rehydration therapy for children with severe diarrhea; and (3) providing Vitamin A to children who lack it in their diet, thereby preventing blindness in 250,000 children/year; b) Iodine Deficiency Program: $40 million/year for iodine addition to table salt to eliminate iodine deficiency, thereby reducing the 566 million people who suffer from goiter and not adding to the 3 million who suffer from overt cretinism; c) AIDS Prevention and Control Program: $9 billion/year allocated as follows: (1) $4 billion for a global AIDS prevention education program; (2) $4 billion for providing multiple drug therapy to AIDS patients in the developing world; (3) $1 billion for research and development for an AIDS vaccine or cure; d) Prevent and Control Malaria: $3 billion/year for bed nets and other malaria prevention and treatment efforts, with $1 billion spent on R & D for an effective malaria vaccine; e) Diabetes Initiative: $1 billion for education and mass screenings. Closely linked with #’s 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 11.

Cost: 19% of what US spends on alcohol and tobacco per year; less than what the U.S. and Japan spend on golf each year
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Strategy 5. Shelter for All: Eliminate Inadequate Housing and Homelessness

$21 billion/year for ten years, allocated for Self-Help Housing that makes available materials, tools and techniques to people without adequate housing ($20 billion/year) and the Housing Tenure Initiative that works to protect people from unfair evictions and secures property rights for them. Closely linked with #’s 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 11.

Cost: Amount US spends on hunting and fishing every 8 months.
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Strategy 6. Food for All: Eliminate Starvation and Malnourishment

$20 billion per year for ten years, allocated for: a) Global Hunger Relief Agency ($5 billion) spent on international grain reserve and emergency famine relief; b) Global Fertilizer Agency ($5 billion) for increasing the amount of indigenous fertilizer used in developing world; c) Increased Irrigation ($2 billion); d) School Lunch Programs ($500 million) for school lunch programs in developing countries; e) Regenerative Food Systems Education and Training ($7.5 billion) for vastly expanding in-country extension services that teach/demonstrate sustainable agriculture, use of local fertilizer sources, pest and soil management techniques, post harvest preservation, and for providing clear market incentives for increased local production; f) $1 billion for Local Food Systems promotion. Educational resources of Strategy 5 coupled with this strategy. Closely linked with #’s 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 11.

Cost: 50% of what US spends on weight loss per year; 17% of what the US spends on the health care costs of obesity; 8.5% of the rich world’s annual subsidies to their richest farmers.
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Strategy 7. Provide Clean, Safe Energy for All

$45 billion/year for ten years allocated for a) Increasing Energy Efficiency ($30 billion) for raising fleet mileage to 50 m.p.g.; doubling appliance, industrial processes, household energy, materials use efficiency and phase out of coal power plants; b) Sustainable Energy Systems ($15 billion) for sustainable energy assessment, fossil and nuclear subsidy eradication, hydrogen fuel incentives, a global energy extension service, sustainable energy microfinance, and sustainable energy R & D. Closely linked with #’s 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10, 11.

Cost: 13% of what U.S. teenagers spend/year; 22% of annual subsidies given to corporations in U.S.
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Strategy 8. Building Democracy and Diversity

$5 billion/year for ten years, allocated for: a) International Democratic Election Fund to finance voter education and multi-party elections in countries making the transition to democracy; b) Global Polling and Referendum Program to ascertain what people from all over the world think and feel about key global issues; c) Global Problem Solving Simulation Tool to enable anyone with Internet access to propose, develop and test strategies for solving real-world problems; d) Global Arts Program; and e) Global Spiritual Heritage Program. Closely linked with #’s 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11.

Cost: 13.5% of what the world spends on hair care; 29% of what Europe and the U.S. spend on pet food.
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Strategy 9. Secure World for All: Eliminate Nuclear Weapons

$15 billion/year for ten years, allocated for: a) Dismantling/Eliminating Nuclear Weapon Programs ($5 billion/year) wherein all the world’s nuclear weapons are dismantled and the bombs’ plutonium and enriched uranium is processed in nuclear reactors that produce power and render the radioactive materials into non-weapons grade material; b) Refugee Relief ($5 billion); c) Landmine Eradication ($2 billion); d) Global PeaceKeepers’ Force ($3 billion). Closely linked with #’s 1, 10.

Cost: 55% of what the US spends on preparing for nuclear war; 53% of what is spent each year on private “security”—private guards, weapons detectors, video surveillance, etc.
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Strategy 10. Credit for All: Debt Management

$30 billion/year for ten years, allocated for a) Debt Retirement ($25 billion/year) for $500 billion or more of current debt discounted to 50% face value to retire all debt of the poorest developing countries; b) Debt for Nature Swap to whereby debt is forgiven for preserving nature; c) Credit for Humanity ($5 billion) for expanding by an order of magnitude the amount micro-loans available in the developing world. Closely linked with #’s 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 10, 11.

Cost: 9% of what the US pays in interest on its national debt; 6.7% of what the world spends on advertising.
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Strategy 11. Reversing Environmental Threats

$32 billion/year for ten years, allocated for: a) Reversing Global Warming ($10 billion) spent on removing fossil energy subsidies, taxing carbon emissions (and other measures—see above #6) b) Planting Trees Initiative ($6 billion) c) Preserving Cropland:/Reversing Desertification ($10 billion) $5 billion spent on converting vulnerable lands; $5 billion on conserving topsoil and reversing desertification; d) Preserve Biodiversity ($3 billion for 30 years) to inventory entire flora and fauna of Earth and to determine the genetic code of every species of life that inhabits the planet; e) Regenerating the Oceans ($3 Billion). Closely linked to # 1, 2, 3, 6.

Cost: $3 billion less than the annual cost of US farmland loss; half the amount of price subsidies given to U.S. and E.U. farmers.
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CONTEXT: Preface

The costs of war are legion; the price of peace is ledged. Redefining wealth and globalization. What groups this book is for.
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CONTEXT: Introduction

The global preferred state; a world of abundance; change models; tipping points and disasters; premises; positive long-term trends.
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CONTEXT: Chapter 1: What Does the World Want?

The Millennium Development Goals, Earth Charter, Universal Declaration of Human Rights, synthesis of all these; the role of globalization; financing what the world wants; other actors on the global stage; what the world does not want.
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CONTEXT: Chapter 2: Enlarging the World's Capacity and Our Humanity

World population 10,000 BC - present; human consciousness as an emergent structure; the value of a human being—how much are you worth?; our enlarging humanity.
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CONTEXT: Chapter 3: Where Globalization is Taking Us

Planetary perspectives; globalization to global synthesis.
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CONTEXT: Chapter 4: Regenerative Development: How to Get Abundance for All

Beyond sustainability; principles of regenerative development;
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CONCLUSIONS: Chapter 1: What We Can Do

Global cooperation through competition;  What national governments can do; Fix the UN, Fix the WTO; Fix the IMF; What the U.S. can do; What China can do; What the U.S and China can do together; What corporations can do; Examples of what corporations can do—energy, food, health, water; What cities can do; What NGOs can do; What individual citizens can do.
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CONCLUSIONS: Chapter 2: Seven Billion Billionaires

Abundance for all; win, win, win, win; How we can pay for it; What governments can do; What civil society can do; a view of the whole; money follows visions; epilogue; Getting the world what it wants.
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